Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and Culture

About Tylor S. Lovins

After studying philosophy at Anderson University, Tylor has been working on a theory of theological language that will express the meanings of religious statements to secular people. He has found the works of Edmund Husserl, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Kenneth Burke, Jordan Peterson, and Hannah Arendt, among others, to be significant in this pursuit.

The Landscape of History and the Power of Words: A Review of Ida (2013)

"The disparities between Ida and Wanda are highly stylized in their clothing and language, in their habits of action, mannerisms, and attentiveness to momentary existence. The interplay between form and content make this movie memorable on a level deeper than mere descriptions can do. Watching Ida, with its understated musical score, sparse dialogue, quiet backgrounds, and suggestive imagery is an experience of deep and forceful subjectivity and awe, an experience not easily forgotten as the people on the screen disappear."

By |2018-11-07T22:56:34+00:00November 1st, 2018|Film Review, Review|0 Comments

#018: Unpacking Jordan Peterson (feat. Tylor Lovins) | A Leap of Doubt

"On this episode, I am joined by Tylor Lovins to discuss the work of Jordan B. Peterson, the controversial clinical psychologist who has in the last two years become something of an academic rockstar. Our discussion mainly focuses on Peterson’s theological and philosophical claims as we try to unpack the complicated and often controversial ideas and concepts Peterson presents in his writings and online lectures and interviews. I have many criticisms of Peterson’s worldview in general, as well as many of his specific ideas and claims, but what I’m primarily interested in doing in this episode is trying to understand Peterson’s ideas and claims both on their own merits and in the context of Peterson’s wider thought so that those of us who are skeptical of his ideas can be in an informed position from which to critique his worldview without strawmanning or misrepresenting him."

By |2018-11-09T21:23:39+00:00July 17th, 2018|Interviews|0 Comments

Revisiting the Matt Dillahunty and Jordan Peterson Discussion

Recently I wrote on how I was disappointed by the Matt Dillahunty and Jordan Peterson dialogue produced by Pangburn Philosophy. Although I still remain fundamentally disappointed by it, a few things have been clarified for me by Matt Dillahunty’s reflections on the discussion. The thing that made the discussion so interesting was that Matt Dillahunty was not interested in debating or strawmanning Peterson. His goal, and I take him at his word, was to have a good conversation, be open and honest, seek clarification, and see where they agree and disagree. He wasn’t even the slightest bit disappointed in the dialogue, thinking he succeeded on many fronts. Maybe [...]

By |2018-11-06T04:54:33+00:00May 3rd, 2018|Philosophy|0 Comments

My Disappointment with the Matt Dillahunty and Jordan Peterson Discussion

Since writing this article, Matt Dillahunty has released his reflections on the discussion. I’ve revisited the dialogue here in light of his comments. I recently listened to the Matt Dillahunty and Jordan Peterson’s Pangburn Philosophy sponsored discussion and was extremely disappointed by it. The discussion represented something that has become commonplace in the secular movement when prominent thinkers attempt to discuss religion: there is a full stop at the question of the existence of God. This is unbelievably stifling and, frankly, uninteresting for (at least a few) reasons I will outline below. After a brief interchange with Dillahunty himself about this, I am still rather unsatisfied by his responses to [...]

By |2018-11-06T04:55:00+00:00April 27th, 2018|Philosophy|0 Comments

On the Meaning of Things: Reading Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 Today

“I don’t talk things, sir,” said Faber. “I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I’m alive.” With the gusto and tenderness of a prophet, Ray Bradbury writes about the all-too-human proclivity to passively waste time: the absence of self reflection and awareness in our human fixations with flashes of images on screens, when our ears and eyes obsess over the constant ramblings of social commentators, as we become bodies in motion, moving according to the laws of security, predictability, and monotony of routine. While the famous Fahrenheit 451 was solidified in ink half a century before our pixelated age , it is written for [...]

By |2018-11-07T23:01:09+00:00April 24th, 2018|Book Review, Review|0 Comments

Why Tell the Truth: On the Curious Notions of Jordan B. Peterson

"As a thinker, he sits firmly within the philosophical traditions spurred by Nietzsche, William James, and Jung. And as an influence, he’s a cultural force that we will not soon forget. Why tell the truth in our age of group-think and Twitter epigrams? Well, it’s our only hope for survival, and the only way for the hero, who speaks a freeing word that organizes chaos into novel order, to emerge."

By |2018-11-06T22:35:02+00:00March 25th, 2018|Philosophy|0 Comments

Episode 9 | The Future of Faith: A Conversation with Tylor Lovins

"This week, Justin sits down with friend and collaborator Tylor Lovins (@tylorlovins). They have recently begun a dialogue on religion and secularism for Christianity Now. In this conversation, Tylor shares with Justin his evolving sense of philosophy and theology, the impact that secularism has had on religion and politics, the problems associated with "identity politics," and the nature of beliefs in the modern world."

By |2018-11-09T21:23:17+00:00August 19th, 2017|Interviews|0 Comments